NC State Community Engaged Faculty Fellows

The Community Engaged Faculty Fellows Program is a learning community focused on community engagement. The fellows keep current with literature and teach or have taught service learning courses. The members were affirmed through the Provost and our membership spans a wide range of departments within NCSU.

The responsibility of the fellows are to serve as mentors for those interested in learning more about community engaged practices. Each fellow advocates for community engaged activities and practice community engagement differently and are more than happy to share these methods with you.

If you would like to know more or get connected with a fellow, please contact any of our fellows noted below.

2011-2012 Engaged Faculty Fellows

  • College: CALS
  • Department: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Campus Box: 7624
  • Biography: Dr. Sarah Ash, NC State’s winner of a Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, pushes her students to engage critically with the world around them. In particular, she and her colleagues have  developed the DEAL  Model for Critical Reflection (Describe, Examine, Articulate Learning) that is designed to generate, deepen and document learning, especially in the context of service-learning, internships and other experiential learning settings.
  • Website: http://ncsu.edu/foodscience/faculty/ash_sarah.htm
  • Publications: The Articulated Learning: An Approach to Guided Reflection and Assessment

 

 

  • College: CHASS
  • Department: Psychology
  • Campus Box: 6750
  • Biography: John is an Associate Professor of School Psychology. He was born in Detroit, MI and has since lived in various parts of the country. John’s current research examines methods to improve children’s reading abilities, systems-level change in schools, international education, and strategies to narrow the gap between research and practice in education. He has received several grants and awards for his teaching and research activities, including grants to improve literacy development for children nationally and internationally. He also received the 2010 Ernest A. Lynton Citation for Distinguished Engaged Scholarship, a nationally competitive award that recognizes an early-career faculty member who demonstrates outstanding integration of community-engaged teaching, research, and service. John’s commitment to engagement is deep, and considers his role as a professor most satisfying when he can meaningfully merge teaching, research, and service.
  • Example Community Engaged Course Taught: PSY 491: Special Topics Course: Community Engaged Scholarship
  • Website: http://psychology.chass.ncsu.edu/pss/faculty/begeny.php
  • Article: Effects of the Helping Early Literacy with Practice Strategies (HELPS) reading fluency program when implemented at different frequencies.

 

 

  • College: Design
  • Department: Architecture
  • Campus Box:7701
  • Biography: Professor Georgia Bizios joined the architecture faculty at NC State University in 1986. She began her academic career at Tulane University where she taught architecture for twelve years. Professor Bizios’ teaching and research interests include architectural design, site and sustainability issues, user involvement in design, theories of placemaking, and principles of architectural design. She has served as Associate Dean at NC State University and Tulane University.
  • Website: http://design.ncsu.edu/users/georgia-bizios

 

 

  • College: CNR
  • Department: Forestry and Environmental Resources
  • Biography:Dr. Bronson P. Bullock is an Associate Professor of Forest Biometrics in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources within the College of Natural Resources at NCSU. He teaches 3 required courses in the undergraduate forestry curriculum (all with labs) that focus on mensuration, inventory, sampling, and modeling. Since 2003, he has incorporated various levels of service-learning and community engagement into many of his courses, placing the students in ‘real-world’ situations where they apply the academic material learned in class. Through this, students gain a deeper understanding of the material while developing critical thinking, teamwork, and leadership skills.
  • Campus Box: 8008
  • Website: http://cnr.ncsu.edu/fer/direct/bullock.php

 

 

 

  • College: Education
  • Department: Curriculum and  Instruction and Counselor Education
  • Campus Box: 7801
  • Biography: Dr. Heather A. Davis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Counselor Education at North Carolina State University. Trained as an educational psychologist, her teaching interests surround helping preservice and practicing teachers use theories of development to meet their students’ needs. For the last ten years, she has worked collaboratively with school districts throughout Georgia, Ohio, and North Carolina to understand the nature of teacher-student relationships and what it means to create schools that fully engage students in the learning process. My research interests include examining social and emotional developmental processes within the context of the classroom. Specifically, my research focuses on understanding how classroom relationships relationships (i.e. with teachers, peers) help students to regulate their emotions and academic behaviors and to feel motivated to learn. My primary line of inquiry explores how children understand teacher closeness and influence and how teachers express warmth and demand in the classroom. My secondary line of research concerns how teachers understand ‘closeness’ and ‘influence’ and how their beliefs about themselves and their students guide their social and pedagogical decision-making.
  • Courses Taught: Undergraduate Seminar: Applied Child Development (EDP 370), Department of Curriculum, Instruction, & Counselor Education
  • Website: http://ced.ncsu.edu/user/heather_davis

 

 

 

 

 

  • College: CALS
  • Department: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences
  • Campus Box: 7624
  • Biography: Dr. Suzie Goodell received her PhD from  the University of Connecticut in Nutritional Sciences and completed her dietetic internship from Cornell University. Her research focuses on childhood obesity prevention and intervention and the relationships between preschool-aged children and the adults in their lives. She observes the interactions that occur between parents, caregivers, and young children during mealtime and then studies the impact these interactions might have on a child’s food consumption and learned eating behaviors. In addition, she develops and implements theory-based obesity prevention interventions for low-income, minority populations based on sound observational investigations and qualitative research. Through teaching and research, Dr. Goodell focuses on service-learning and opportunities to engage students in work in the community. In addition to her research, Dr. Goodell teaches two service-learning based courses, Community Nutrition and the major’s senior capstone Experience in Teaching, Research or Service in Nutrition
  • Website: http://www.ncsu.edu/foodscience/faculty/goodell_suzie.htm

 

 

  • College: Education
  • Department: Curriculum and  Instruction and Counselor Education
  • Campus Box: 7801
  • Biography: Dr. Grimmett is an Associate Professor of Counselor Education. The conceptual framework for his approach to research and scholarship is titled R.A.D.I.C.A.L. scholarship which means Research Activism to Deconstruct Institutionalized Cultures and Advocate for Liberation.  This framework currently includes four areas of concentration and corresponding goals, which are: transforming contextual and systemic factors to promote the healthy development of African American boys; facilitating access to mental health counseling using a counselor education program-based community mental health clinic; creating social justice counselor education teaching methods; and preventing power-based violence through education, activism, and community partnerships.
  • Website: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~magrimme/marcgrimmett/Home.html

 

 

  • College: CALS
  • Department: Soil Science
  • Campus Box: 7619
  • Biography: Dr. Grossman’s research broadly explores the ways in which we can better manage plant-soil-microbe relationships in order to enhance soil fertility through microbial processes, with the ultimate goal of developing sustainable food production systems. Dr. Grossman advises a great diversity of students and takes pride in helping them build skills in the deeply intertwined areas of sustainable agriculture research, teaching, and outreach. She is strongly committed to community-based learning in science education and uses a service-learning approach to link her classroom to local community gardening partners, such as non-profit organizations and elementary schools. Dr. Grossman holds an M.S. in Soil Science and Ph.D. in Agronomy and Plant Genetics from the University of Minnesota, and was an NSF Post-doctoral Fellow at Cornell University before coming to NCSU in 2008. She also serves as the Chair of the Sustainable Agriculture Education Association Steering Council, a national organization supporting the development, application, research, and exchange of best teaching and learning practices in sustainable agriculture.
  • Website: http://grossman.soil.ncsu.edu/ 

 

  • College: CHASS
  • Department: History
  • Campus Box: 8108
  • Biography: Dr. Gustke grew up in Detroit, Michigan and completed a B.S. (with honors) in Interior Design from Michigan State University. She received an M.F.A. in American Art History from the University of Florida, and a Ph.D. in History from the University of New Hampshire.  She moved to Apex, North Carolina in 1989 and has been teaching at NC State since 1991. Her current research is on American cities that call/called themselves Athens or “The Athens of America” and presented her latest research at the Athens Institute for Education and Research in Athens, Greece this past December. Dr. Gustke teaches the Early American and Modern American history survey courses, including seminars for the First Year Inquiry program and First Year College. Dr. Gustke is also the director of The London/Paris Experience study abroad summer program.
  • Resources: https://velocity.ncsu.edu/dl/Khm7zEp/52952, http://www.wolftrackstate.com/

 

 

  • College: CNR
  • Department: Forestry and Environmental Resources
  • Campus Box: 8008
  • Biography: In everything I teach, my goals are to (1) excite students about the prospect of continuous learning and the process of figuring things out for themselves, (2) focus explicitly on professional skills, including collaboration, communication, critical thinking, and organization, and (3) place students in the types of situations they will encounter after graduation by using engaged, project-based approaches to teaching. In research, I focus on the conservation of open spaces in suburbanizing regions, particularly as habitat for native plants and animals. My research efforts have three major thrusts: (1) improve the breadth and quality of ecologically-based information available to land use planners; (2) develop approaches to incorporating scientific findings about conservation into local planning activities by engaging with community partners; and (3) support the active engagement of students with community partners to address local conservation challenges.
  • Example Community Engaged Course Taught: Conservation Biology in Practice,Natural Resources Measurements
  • Website: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~grhess/

 

 

  • College: Education
  • Department: Leadership, Policy, Adult and Higher Education
  • Campus Box: 7801
  • Biography: Audrey J. Jaeger is an Associate Professor of Educational Research & Policy Analysis with a focus on Higher Education. For thepast few years, Dr. Jaeger as been working with the Office of Faculty Development on building a supportive climate and for faculty engaged with the community. Dr. Jaeger’s research focuses on building capacity for engaged scholarship with future faculty, current faculty, and higher education administrators. She co-edited a book that addressed the status of community engagement entitled “Institutionalizing Community Engagement in Higher Education: The First Wave of Carnegie Classified Institutions.” Dr. Jaeger serves on several national organizations that address community engagement and is often called upon to address the preparation of graduate students in the area of community engagement.
  • Website: http://ced.ncsu.edu/user/audrey_jaeger
  • Articles: Institutionalization of Community-Engaged Scholarship at Institutions that are Both Land-Grant and research Universities, Advising Graduate Students Doing Community-Engaged Dissertation Research

 

 

  • College: CHASS
  • Department: Communication
  • Campus Box: 8104
  • Biography: Jessica Katz Jameson, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Associate Head for Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Communication at North Carolina State University. She teaches courses and conducts community-engaged  research on the topics of organizational communication, conflict management, and nonprofit leadership. She is a past chair of the Academic Council for the  Institute for Nonprofit Research, Education and Engagement and serves on the Extension, Engagement and Economic Development committee for the  College of Humanities and Social Sciences. She was co-facilitator of EDGES,Education and Discovery Grounded in Engaged Scholarship, a faculty development program to promote and build capacity for engaged scholarship at NC  State.
  • Example Community Engagement Course Taught: COM 466, Nonprofit Leadership & Development
  • Website: http://communication.chass.ncsu.edu/faculty_staff/jameson
  • Articles: Institutionalization of Community-Engaged Scholarship at Institutions that are both Land-Grant and Research Universities

 

 

 

  • College: CHASS
  • Department: English
  • Campus Box: 8105
  • Biography: Associate Professor, spent 12 years in television and advertising before turning to the study of writing in public and private organizations. She earned her Ph.D. in Communication and Rhetoric at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1996. Dr. Katz teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the rhetoric of science and technology and coordinates the English Department Internship Program. Her research interests include the integration of verbal and visual rhetorics and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Dr. Katz has given presentations on workplace writing at many conferences and has published articles in The Journal of Engineering EducationThe Journal of Business Communication, the IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, and The Extended CCC. She is the author of The Dynamics of Writing Review: Opportunities for Growth and Change in the Workplace, a chapter of which was reprinted in the anthology Professional Writing and Rhetoric: Readings from the Field. She is co-author of Writing Now, a composition textbook published by Bedford/St. Martin’s in 2009. Dr. Katz is the recipient of the IEEE Professional Communication Society Outstanding Paper Award (1999), the NCSU College of Humanities and Social Sciences Outstanding Junior Faculty Award (2001), and the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools Achievement Award for New Scholars in the Humanities and the Arts (2003). In 2011 she was named an NCSU Community of Engaged Faculty Fellow for her work with the undergraduate and graduate internship programs in the Department of English.
  • Website: http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/faculty_staff/smk
  • Example Courses Taught: ENG350 Professional Internships and ENG522 Writing in Nonacademic Settings
  • Article: Service-learning Partnerships: Is There a Snake in the Garden?

 

 

 

  • College: CALS
  • Department: Agriculture and Resource Economics
  • Campus Box: 8107
  • Biography: Dr. Edward L. Kick is a Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics, and Professor of Sociology, at North Carolina State University.  Dr. Kick publishes articles and books on the world system, environment, community building, and sustainability.  Up until recently he served as the co-Editor of the Journal of World-Systems Research, and he has served for seventeen years as university administrator.  His research and mentoring of students is primarily quantitative and cross-national in nature, although he also has conducted more intensive studies of countries, such as his case study of peanut farmers in Ghana, Africa.  In recent years he has published on a variety of subjects that he ties together as part of writing and teaching.  This work includes: decision making by disaster victims in the wake of catastrophic events, such as hurricanes and flooding;  what is called “the ecological footprint” or the environmental well-being of the world and nations; the military and its influences on world and national hunger;  the linkages between open markets, national sound money policies and “comparative advantage” on national modernization;  community building in the US and abroad with its attendant displacement of populations, and the impact of human and infrastructural waste on the well-being of those who live close to dumping sites.
  • Courses Taught: Sociology 311, Community Relations

 

 

  • College: CHASS
  • Department: Communication
  • Campus Box: 8104
  • Biography: Dr. James Kiwanuka-Tondo has taught numerous courses including Communication Research Methods, Communication Campaigns, Intercultural/International Communication, Public Relations Applications (PR Campaigns), Media Effects, Interpersonal Communication, Small Group Communication, and Feature Writing. His research interest is health communication campaigns, especially the AIDS campaigns. His work has been published in the Journal of Health Communication, among others. Dr. Kiwanuka-Tondo was awarded a grant worth $20,000 from the John M. Lloyd Foundation to study the effectiveness of the Uganda campaigns. He has received several grants from the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the British Council, UNESCO, the University of Connecticut, and North Carolina State University. Dr. Kiwanuka-Tondo was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Central Connecticut State Univ. for one year and the Univ. of Connecticut for three years. He was also Head of School of Journalism, Uganda Management Institute, for three years. He received the Outstanding Graduate Teacher Award 2008, Dept. of Communication, NC State Univ.; the Advocacy Award for Promoting the Presence of African American at NC State Univ.; the Outstanding Teacher Award, Dept. of Communication, NC State Univ., spring 2007; the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award, 1999, University of Connecticut. He is a recipient of the Fulbright Scholarship, the British Commonwealth Technical Assistance Scholarship, and is a Fellow of the Salzburg Seminar.
  • Website: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~jkiwanu/index.html

 

 

  • College: CNR
  • Department: Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management
  • Campus Box: 8004
  • Biography: Annette Moore is a Lecturer in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management at North Carolina State University.  She received her Master’s degree in Recreation Management from Northeastern University and is currently working on her Ph.D. in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management from North Carolina State University.  She joined NC State’s faculty in 1992, with primary focus being teaching undergraduate courses in recreation program planning and the department’s introductory course. Annette’s students are engaged with the community in both her first year, introductory course (a 4-hour experience), and in her junior-level recreation program planning class (PRT 358), a full-immersion service-learning course. Community partners, vital to the success of student learning in PRT 358, have been engaged since Spring 2001.With a professional focus of providing opportunities for students to becoming immersed in learning experiences, Annette has found study abroad to be a natural extension of her teaching approach.  Since 2006, she has co-directed summer study abroad programs to Australia and New Zealand.
  • Example Community Engaged Course Taught: PRT 358 – The Recreation Program
  • Website: http://cnr.ncsu.edu/prtm/faculty/moore.php

 

 

  • College: CALS
  • Department: Crop Science
  • Campus Box: 7620
  • Biography: Dr. Schroeder-Moreno is an ecologist by training and received her B.S. at UC Irvine in Applied Ecology in 1996 and her Ph.D. in Ecology, with an emphasis on Tropical Ecology, at the University of Miami in 2003. Her interests are twofold and include developing new agroecology and sustainable agriculture education curriculum at NC State that and developing research projects that focus on understanding the benefits of mycorrhizal fungi and associated sustainable management practices for a variety of production systems. Dr. Schroeder-Moreno also advises for the student run Campus Farmers Market at NC State and chairs the Education Programs at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems.
  • Website: http://www.cropsci.ncsu.edu/personnel/Schroeder-Moreno_Michelle/

 

 

  • Ms. Sandy Stallings, Lecturer
  • College: CHASS
  • Department: Communication
  • Campus Box: 8104
  • Biography: Ms. Stallings’s academic interests reflect her broad range of teaching experiences – from the elementary level, to high school, to community college, and both private and public institutions.  These experiences have contributed to her respect for the possibilities inherent in the interdisciplinary approach to education and the Self-Design opportunity in particular.   Her training in Service-Learning is reflected in her approach to the IDS 490 Capstone class where students use the education from their Self-Design curriculums to support organizations within the community.  She received her Bachelor’s degree in Theatre and Speech (Longwood College) and her Master’s degree in Speech (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill).  Ms. Stallings is also serving simultaneously as the Assistant Head for Advising in the Department of Communication.
  • Courses Taught: COM 110, Public Speaking and IDS 490, Interdisciplinary Studies Methods and Issues